Who benefits from using Derivatives?

By Praveen Gupta
What is CGR PhD's research about?
Introducing research projects of CGR PhD members

Financial Derivatives are instruments that were invented, at least in theory, to protect us from various risks arising in uncertain markets. In an ideal world, they were expected to work like this:

However, a combination of weak regulatory framework, individual greed and financial innovation gone rouge, resulted in 2008 financial crisis, which many blame on excessive and sometimes illegitimate use of Financial Derivatives.

Praveen03

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CGR Annual Globalisation Seminar and Workshop on Political Economy and Economic Development

On Wednesday, 4th of December the Centre for Globalisation Research (CGR) of the School of Business and Management, Queen Mary University of London is hosting the annual workshop on Political Economy and Economic Development and the Annual Globalisation Seminar.

This year the Annual Globalisation Seminar on the ‘The Political Effects of Internet and False News’ will be held by Professor Ekaterina Zhuravskaya.

Fake news facts

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Popular Brand Names and Clutter

Business Analytics, Management and Economics

On March 15th the IP Conversazione took place in Oxford as part of the 17th Annual Oxford International Intellectual Property Law Moot. The moot pitted students of IP law from around the world against each other to argue a trade mark case involving two identical trade marks used for different but reasonably similar goods. Roger Teichman and I were invited to speak to participants about work related to this question. This post summarises some of my comments and adds some details that have emerged since.

Philosophy of Trademarks

Roger drew our attention to Borges’ classification of animals that includes headings such as: “embalmed ones” and “others”. This classification, though odd,  might well serve a purpose and it can be used to group animals together that are similar with respect to the classification. Roger used the example to illustrate a point: a judgement that animals or goods are similar requires a…

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CGR Workshop | The Moral Economy Revisited: Lessons for institutional development

Organised by: Dr. Martha Prevezer and Prof. Perri 6

The workshop includes discussions on the development of theory leading to a rethinking of neoliberalism, recasting of the concept of moral economy to integrate it with institutional explanations, a rethinking of poverty alleviation and a recognition and making visible the institutional forces that influence how people think and behave. It will also considers the causal assumptions on which policies are designed.

Venue: GC601, Graduate Centre, Mile End Campus
Date: Thursday, 13th June 2019

This event is free to attend. Register here.Read More »

The Industrial Revolution: capabilities and institutions

BY DR. RAVSHONBEK (ROSH) OTOJANOV

In my previous post, I summarised a demand-side explanation of the British Industrial Revolution. In this post, I will outline a supply-side explanation put forward by economic historians Margaret Jacob and Joel Mokyr. According to the supporters of the supply-side explanation, Britain had a supply of human capital who were capable of using science and engineering knowledge to solve practical problems. Besides having a comparative advantage in human capital over continental Europe, by the eighteenth century, Britain had the necessary institutional environment that promoted the principles of the market economy. Interaction between the forces of market economy and science made the practical applications of scientific discoveries more successful in Britain. This did not happen in continental Europe, because, for centuries, the political and religious establishment had been restricting the advancement of science if it conflicted with their political agenda and Western Europe was politically fragmented.

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Brown Bag Seminar | Mapping the Technological Frontier

On Monday, 4th February, Dr. Sergio Petralia post-doctoral researcher at the LSE and affiliated associate of the Center for International Development at Harvard University is presenting part of his research on emergence and spatial concentration of new technologies. He will be discussing a paper titled: ‘Mapping the Technological Frontier’

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Brexit Britain – Will the Industrial Strategy Deliver?

BY GEORG VON GRAEVENITZ
Re-blogged

Business Analytics, Management and Economics

At the heart of the government’s industrial strategy is a commitment to increase overall UK investment in R&D to 2.4% of GDP in 2027. Currently investment stands at 1.67% of GDP. So this has got to be a good thing? Actually this target is not very ambitious when measured against comparable countries and this lack of ambition is likely to affect the future prosperity of people living in the UK.

A comparison between the UK, France and Germany using OECD data shows that the UK has invested less in R&D than France as a share of GDP since 1986 and less than Germany since 1980. These differences are large and have persisted over a long time. It is perhaps worth noting that the share of R&D spending in GDP for the United states has always been above 2.4% and recently has been at around 2.7%.

oecd_rd_pctofgdp

If the UK brings investment…

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