Popular Brand Names and Clutter

Business Analytics, Management and Economics

On March 15th the IP Conversazione took place in Oxford as part of the 17th Annual Oxford International Intellectual Property Law Moot. The moot pitted students of IP law from around the world against each other to argue a trade mark case involving two identical trade marks used for different but reasonably similar goods. Roger Teichman and I were invited to speak to participants about work related to this question. This post summarises some of my comments and adds some details that have emerged since.

Philosophy of Trademarks

Roger drew our attention to Borges’ classification of animals that includes headings such as: “embalmed ones” and “others”. This classification, though odd,  might well serve a purpose and it can be used to group animals together that are similar with respect to the classification. Roger used the example to illustrate a point: a judgement that animals or goods are similar requires a…

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Brexit Britain – Will the Industrial Strategy Deliver?

BY GEORG VON GRAEVENITZ
Re-blogged

Business Analytics, Management and Economics

At the heart of the government’s industrial strategy is a commitment to increase overall UK investment in R&D to 2.4% of GDP in 2027. Currently investment stands at 1.67% of GDP. So this has got to be a good thing? Actually this target is not very ambitious when measured against comparable countries and this lack of ambition is likely to affect the future prosperity of people living in the UK.

A comparison between the UK, France and Germany using OECD data shows that the UK has invested less in R&D than France as a share of GDP since 1986 and less than Germany since 1980. These differences are large and have persisted over a long time. It is perhaps worth noting that the share of R&D spending in GDP for the United states has always been above 2.4% and recently has been at around 2.7%.

oecd_rd_pctofgdp

If the UK brings investment…

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Industrial Revolution: powerful innovations

By Dr. Ravshonbek (Rosh) Otojanov

The British Industrial Revolution was a watershed moment in the history of humanity; an important result of which was an irreversible positive turning point in the living standards. There have been a number of explanations to what facilitated the transition from low to modern growth in the eighteenth century. In a series of brief posts, I will document the two of the many explanations put forward by scholars Robert Allen and Joe Mokyr. Both the scholars put technological progress at the centre-stage, but they differ in their views on what provided impetus to the technological progress.

Real GDP for the 1500-1914 period. The shaded region covers the 1760-1900 period
                      Real GDP, 1500-1914.                                           Shaded region: 1760-1900.               Data: Broadberry et al. (2015)

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The Economic Effects of Copyright – Using CREATe & CORE Resources to Inform Regulators and Lawyers

By  Georg von Graevenitz

 

The First Asia-Pacific Workshop on Empirical Methods in Innovation, IP and Competition was held at National Law University in Delhi in early March 2017. The workshop brought together researchers and regulators from India and South East Asia. Sessions focussed on the economics of IP law, the link between competition and IP law, regulation of competition and empirical research on effects of patents, trade marks, copyright and alternatives to IP.

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Predicting Sales with Google Trends

By  Georg von Graevenitz

 In 2009 the German government spent around 5 billion € to incentivize the replacement of older cars and to keep the car industry afloat after the financial crisis of 2008. The graph on the left below shows the smoothed market shares of the main manufacturers selling cars in Germany before and after that year.

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What drives the Uber economy? New CGR paper highlights the role of labour regulations

One of the most significant ways in which labour markets are changing is the rise of the so-called “Gig Economy”, a pattern in which firms increasingly employ contractors. New disruptive companies are built on this model that allows these new start-ups to grow and adapt quickly while their contractors enjoy flexibility to work when and how they want. However, as the recent strikes of UberEats and Deliveroo couriers across London remind us, this new model of employment relations comes with its own sets of challenges and possible pitfalls.  A new CGR Working Paper, “The third worker: assessing the trade-off between employees and contractors”, by Pedro Martins, –Professor of Applied Economics at the School of Business and Management, Queen Mary, University of London,-provides new insights on the decision-making process of firms when choosing between contractors or employees.

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