CGR in the news | Professor Granville interviewed by The New York Times

As Brexit Looms, Paris Tries a Business Makeover
By David Segal / 10 Dec 2017 / New York Times

(…) “When you grow up in France, none of the heroes you learn about are entrepreneurs,” said Brigitte Granville, a professor of economics at Queen Mary University of London, who was raised in France. “When someone gets rich in France, people immediately ask, ‘What did he do to make this money? He must be a nasty person.’” (…)

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Against minimalistic Europe: More democracy and more participation to make integration stronger

By Beatriz Rodriguez-Satizabal

Dr Stella Ladi, programme co-director of the Masters in Public Administration (MPA) and member of CGR, participated as a panellist in a debate about the recently published book Reset Europe: New directions for the EU written by Richard Youngs. The event organised by the Centre for European Research at QMUL by Sarah Wolff, CER director, started with Youngs presentation of his book and finalised with a roundtable discussion.

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The Anatomy of Populists’ Backstops across the EU.

By Jaume Martorell Cruz

In her latest article for Project Syndicate, Professor Brigitte Granville scrutinized the anatomy of the populist movements that have been gaining political ground in many western countries. Published this February and drawing on the insights of various Project Syndicate contributors, the article explained how these different movements have a similar zero sum view of the world and pointed to the then forthcoming elections in the Netherlands and France as bellwethers.

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Economics or Identity? Professor Brigitte Granville latest article explores the reasons for the rise of the “Front National” in France

The upcoming French elections are the new bellwether of populist politics. In the two-round presidential contest, polls point to Marine Le Pen making it into, but then losing, the second round run-off. Nonetheless, reflecting the growing appeal of the National Front (FN), Ms Le Pen is poised to do considerably better than her father – Jean Marie Le Pen – did in 2002, when he got through to the second round against the then incumbent, Jacques Chirac. In her latest article for the OMFIF bulletin, “Unemployment spurs Le Pen Phenomenon”, Professor Brigitte Granville – CGR Director – argues that to explain the strength of the FN, the poor performance of the French economy matters even more than immigration and other issues touching on identity politics.

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Prof Granville on the “Lessons from the Collapse of the Ruble Zone and the Transferable Ruble System”

The consequences of Brexit – especially at pivotal moments in the process like the UK triggering Art.50 at the end of March 2017 – will command attention not only in the UK and the rest of Europe but also among all those around the world looking at Europe with interest and concern. While the implications of Brexit should not be downplayed, the whole subject risks becoming a distraction from the even more important question of the sustainability of the Euro. The deep effects of the chronic crisis of the Eurozone – including, arguably, contributing to Brexit – are generally overlooked, with the economic and political tensions of the Euro only resurfacing periodically when the Greek government needs to access new tranches of the bailout agreement. The fundamental tensions remaining largely unresolved. Since the Eurozone is a source of major potential shocks to the global economy and financial system, the reasons for the failure to resolve those tensions deserve continued close scrutiny.

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Prof Sushanta Mallick’s up-coming Inaugural lecture “How did the ‘open door policy’ help in catching-up? The Great Liberalisation of the 1990s”

The next Tuesday 28th of March, Prof Sushanta Mallick – CGR member and Professor of International Finance at the School of Business and Management, Queen Mary University of London–  will deliver his Inaugural Lecture, examining how far the developing countries have come in their process of growth following the rapid pace of policy reforms in the 1990s.  Prof Mallick makes a key distinction between trade and financial liberalisation, finding that many low-income countries have benefitted from trade openness in improving their pricing power in the global market place but there is a long way to go to achieve the degree of financial deepening or openness that exists in high-income countries. 

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“Unconventional monetary policy in the past: Lessons for today” CGR working paper covered in VOX

In one of the latest CGR working papers, “Danger to the Old Lady of Threadneedle Street? The Bank Restriction Act and the Regime Shift to Paper Money, 1791-1821”, Prof Patrick O’Brien and Dr Nuno Palma obtain important lessons of past monetary policies to explain today’s unconventional monetary policies. As they describe in the abstract:
 

The Bank Restriction Act of 1797 made legal the Bank of England’s suspension of the convertibility of its banknotes. The current historical consensus is that it was a result of the state’s need to finance the war, France’s remonetisation, a loss of confidence in the English country banks, and a run on the Bank of England’s reserves. We argue that while these factors help us understand the timing of the Restriction period, they cannot explain its success. We deploy new long-term data which leads us to a complementary explanation: the policy succeeded thanks to the reputation of the Bank of England, achieved through a century of monetary stability

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Confronting France’s Jihadism: Prof Granville new article on Project Syndicate

Professor Brigitte GranvilleCGRDirector- has written a new article in Project Syndicate. In the article Prof Granville “examines what Fawaz Gerges, Noëlle Lenoir, Bernard-Henri Lévy, and other Project Syndicate commentators think is driving repeated terrorist attacks, and what should be done to stop them.” In “Confronting France’s Jihadism” Prof Granville rounds these analyses and provides additional comment on the underlying causes behind the recent spate of terrorist attacks that have blighted France.

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Prof Brigitte Granville discusses Europe’s future in the European Financial Congress

Professor Brigitte Granville, Director the Centre for Globalisation Research, will participate in the European Financial Congress, to be celebrated on Sopot during 13-15th of June 2016. Professor Granville will participate in the opening debate discussing “Europe’s Future: Possible scenarios”.

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