New edited volume | Research on Economic Inequality: poverty, inequality and welfare.

By Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay

Since 2014, I have coordinated and run an annual workshop on theoretical and empirical research on the analysis of poverty, inequality and mobility, generously supported by the School of Business and Management at Queen Mary University of London.

Following the 2016 workshop, several of the presented papers formed the basis for an edited volume of the journal Research on Economic Inequality (Bandyopadhyay 2018). The ten contributions address issues that are at the forefront of the discussion on how we measure poverty, inequality and welfare and how we use such measurements to devise policies to deliver social mobility. While some of the papers deal with theoretical issues that question current methods on how we measure poverty, inequality and welfare, some of them use novel techniques and datasets to investigate the dynamics of poverty and welfare, with special reference to developing countries.

Munia_Edited volume

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CGR Workshop on Development

On Friday, 8th of June the Centre of Globalisation Research (CGR) of the School of Business and Management, Queen Mary University of London is hosting a workshop on development organised by Prof. Almudena Sevilla.

abstract develoment cloud

Dr Adrienne Lucas (University of Delaware), Professor Kaivan Munshi (University of Cambridge), Dr Caterina Gennaioli (Queen Mary University of London) and Professor Michael Kremer (Harvard University), are presenting their most recent research on development economics.

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Brown Bag Seminar | Social protection and child poverty risk: does persistence matter?

Next Wednesday 16th of May, Dr Elena Bárcena Martín will be presenting her research. Dr  Elena Bárcena Martín works at the University of Malaga as an Associate Professor of Statistic and Econometrics. She has been research visitor at Columbia University and LSE where she studied the Master of Science in Econometrics and Mathematical Economics.

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to analyse to what extent the previous status of children in poverty affects current child poverty, even when we control for observed and unobserved individual heterogeneity and treat the initial condition problem. On the basis of Wooldridge’s (2005) methodology, we estimate a dynamic random effects probit model considering three levels due to the hierarchical structure of our data: observations for each year (level 1) of the children (level 2) nested into countries (level 3). We corroborate the relevance of lagged status in poverty and assess the role of context variables in explaining differences across countries in child poverty dynamics. In particular, we highlight the significance of family benefits in reducing child poverty and assess which features of these benefits are more effective to reduce child poverty. This way, some key insights are provided to design more effective public policies to alleviate child poverty.

Email: barcenae@uma.es

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Making bad economies: The poverty of Mexican drug cartels

By Roxana Gutiérrez-Romero
Re-blogged

Some stories say that local economies benefit from cartels in Mexico. But research suggests that the areas most plagued by drug-related violence have seriously suffered economically. 

Mexico is facing one of the most violent episodes in its recent history. The country has had over 200,000 drug-related killings since 2006. Last year alone, 29,168 homicides were recorded, reaching the highest homicide rate over the last 20 years, surpassing the previous historical peak in 2011 when drug cartel violence accounted for nearly half of all national homicides.

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Prof Sushanta Mallick’s up-coming Inaugural lecture “How did the ‘open door policy’ help in catching-up? The Great Liberalisation of the 1990s”

The next Tuesday 28th of March, Prof Sushanta Mallick – CGR member and Professor of International Finance at the School of Business and Management, Queen Mary University of London–  will deliver his Inaugural Lecture, examining how far the developing countries have come in their process of growth following the rapid pace of policy reforms in the 1990s.  Prof Mallick makes a key distinction between trade and financial liberalisation, finding that many low-income countries have benefitted from trade openness in improving their pricing power in the global market place but there is a long way to go to achieve the degree of financial deepening or openness that exists in high-income countries. 

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New CGR Working Paper: The Persistence of Inequality across Indian States, by Dr Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay

Dr Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay -Senior Lecturer in Economics at Queen Mary, University of London, and CGR Deputy Director- has published a new CGR working paper on “The Persistence of Inequality across Indian States”. Dr Bandyopadhyay organises the annual “Workshop on the Theory and Empirics of Inequality, Poverty, and Mobility” and, as she remarked in this year workshop, these are interesting times for researchers on inequality and development, with vibrant debates on inequality and poverty across academia and beyond. Not only have the recent works of Thomas Piketty and Tony Atkinson revived the public debate on inequality, but Angus Deaton received the Nobel Memorial Prize on Economic Sciences for his analysis on consumption, poverty, and Welfare.

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