Brown Bag Seminar | Social protection and child poverty risk: does persistence matter?

Next Wednesday 16th of May, Dr Elena Bárcena Martín will be presenting her research. Dr  Elena Bárcena Martín works at the University of Malaga as an Associate Professor of Statistic and Econometrics. She has been research visitor at Columbia University and LSE where she studied the Master of Science in Econometrics and Mathematical Economics.

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to analyse to what extent the previous status of children in poverty affects current child poverty, even when we control for observed and unobserved individual heterogeneity and treat the initial condition problem. On the basis of Wooldridge’s (2005) methodology, we estimate a dynamic random effects probit model considering three levels due to the hierarchical structure of our data: observations for each year (level 1) of the children (level 2) nested into countries (level 3). We corroborate the relevance of lagged status in poverty and assess the role of context variables in explaining differences across countries in child poverty dynamics. In particular, we highlight the significance of family benefits in reducing child poverty and assess which features of these benefits are more effective to reduce child poverty. This way, some key insights are provided to design more effective public policies to alleviate child poverty.

Email: barcenae@uma.es

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Making bad economies: The poverty of Mexican drug cartels

By Roxana Gutiérrez-Romero
Re-blogged

Some stories say that local economies benefit from cartels in Mexico. But research suggests that the areas most plagued by drug-related violence have seriously suffered economically. 

Mexico is facing one of the most violent episodes in its recent history. The country has had over 200,000 drug-related killings since 2006. Last year alone, 29,168 homicides were recorded, reaching the highest homicide rate over the last 20 years, surpassing the previous historical peak in 2011 when drug cartel violence accounted for nearly half of all national homicides.

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CGR in the news | Professor Granville interviewed by The New York Times

As Brexit Looms, Paris Tries a Business Makeover
By David Segal / 10 Dec 2017 / New York Times

(…) “When you grow up in France, none of the heroes you learn about are entrepreneurs,” said Brigitte Granville, a professor of economics at Queen Mary University of London, who was raised in France. “When someone gets rich in France, people immediately ask, ‘What did he do to make this money? He must be a nasty person.’” (…)

Read full article here

Report on the Annual Globalisation Seminar and Workshop in Political Economy and Economic Policy

By Beatriz Rodriguez-Satizabal

Last Thursday saw the annual edition of the Workshop in Political Economy and Economic Policy and the Globalisation Seminar Series organised by Dr. Caterina Gennaioli. Along with the Brown Bag Seminars and the Workshop on the Theory and Empirics of Poverty, Inequality and Mobility, the annual seminar and workshop constitutes the CGR’s main effort in further the research on economic and political global concerns. The Centre seeks to offer a platform to prominent academics and policy-makers to discuss the latest debates on global issues such as immigration and social mobility. This year the seminar was co-sponsored by the Royal Economic Society.

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Globalisation Seminar Series and Workshop in Political Economy and Economic Policy

The Globalisation Seminar Series is a prestigious series offering a platform to prominent academics, policy-makers and business people to discuss the latest debate in economics and economic policy. This year is organised by the new director of the Centre for Globalisation Research (CGR), Dr. Caterina Gennaioli (QMUL) and co-sponsored by the Royal Economic Society.

Alesina2

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Brown Bag Seminar | Can non-cognitive interventions improve academic outcomes? The first CGR brown-bag presents experimental evidence on this question

The Centre for Globalisation Research will launch on May 14th its ‘Brown-bag’ seminar series, which seeks to discuss the new research of CGR members. The workshop will be inaugurated by Prof Pedro Martins who will present his latest CGR working paper: “(How) Do Non-Cognitive Skills Programs Improve Adolescent School Achievement? Experimental Evidence”.

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