Terrorism: a threat to entrepreneurship?

By Abdullah Ijaz

Terrorism is a complex phenomenon and it has deteriorating effects on the global economy. Since 2002, the world has witnessed a rise in all forms of terrorism. The economic disruptions caused by violent attacks and the fear of terrorism are massive. The global economic impact of terrorism amounted to USD33 billion in 2018 in constant PPP terms. Fear of terrorism influences economic behaviour and changes investment climate of the affected region (Global Terrorism Index, 2019). The direct costs of terrorism include deaths, injuries, GDP losses, property damage for the countries in conflicted zones. However, there are many indirect costs involved as well such as decline in tourism, financial markets, trade, foreign direct investment and entrepreneurship (Tingbani et al., 2018).

According to Global Terrorism Index 2019, South Asia, MENA and Sub-Saharan Africa are the most impacted regions which accounted for 93% of all deaths from terrorism. These regions also had most lethal attacks, averaging 1.95, 2.67 and 4.11 people killed per attack respectively.

Abdullah Ijaz
Source: GTD, IEP Calculations

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Brown Bag Seminar | Can non-cognitive interventions improve academic outcomes? The first CGR brown-bag presents experimental evidence on this question

The Centre for Globalisation Research will launch on May 14th its ‘Brown-bag’ seminar series, which seeks to discuss the new research of CGR members. The workshop will be inaugurated by Prof Pedro Martins who will present his latest CGR working paper: “(How) Do Non-Cognitive Skills Programs Improve Adolescent School Achievement? Experimental Evidence”.

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What drives the Uber economy? New CGR paper highlights the role of labour regulations

One of the most significant ways in which labour markets are changing is the rise of the so-called “Gig Economy”, a pattern in which firms increasingly employ contractors. New disruptive companies are built on this model that allows these new start-ups to grow and adapt quickly while their contractors enjoy flexibility to work when and how they want. However, as the recent strikes of UberEats and Deliveroo couriers across London remind us, this new model of employment relations comes with its own sets of challenges and possible pitfalls.  A new CGR Working Paper, “The third worker: assessing the trade-off between employees and contractors”, by Pedro Martins, –Professor of Applied Economics at the School of Business and Management, Queen Mary, University of London,-provides new insights on the decision-making process of firms when choosing between contractors or employees.

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