Technological platforms in South Korean automotive, electronics and service robotics industries

By Soo Jung Oh

My research aims to explore and compare technological platforms in the South Korean automotive, electronics and service robotics industries to extend our understanding of why and how organisations build and use different types of technological platforms.

A technological platform is a modular architecture consisting of core components and peripheral components. The core components provide a foundation for peripheral components to be developed. For example, Apple’s iPhone is a core, and it gives a basis for application development which is a periphery. Therefore, technological platforms connect companies who can innovate and compete by developing core components as well as peripheral components.

Industrial robotic arms
Image from https://www.manufacturingglobal.com/technology/rise-robotics-manufacturing

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Vocational education in China

By Li Dai and Pedro Martins

Vocational education is an important and well-established alternative to academic education. In most countries, the number of vocational graduates is now on par with that of academic graduates. In the case of China, there are approximately 11 million students graduating with vocational education qualifications annually, only slightly less than the around 12 million academic graduates per year.

Dai Martins MAR2020

Figure 1. The density of secondary vocational schools in China (More details in the paper)

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Training grants: a useful policy to address productivity gaps (including during the corona virus outbreak)?

By Pedro S. Martins

Recent research by the European Investment Bank indicates that workers in Europe spend less than 0.5% of their working time on training. This figure seems too low and indeed economics has long predicted some degree of under-provision of training. First, training is expensive for firms, as it entails significant direct and indirect costs. Second, employers know they will lose their investments in training if employees subsequently leave.

Public policy may play a role in alleviating the market failure that leads to such under-provision of training. The new working paper featured in this blog (‘Employee training and firm performance’) contributes empirical evidence to this question. The research evaluates the effects of a €200-million EU training grants scheme on different dimensions of firms.

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Terrorism: a threat to entrepreneurship?

By Abdullah Ijaz

Terrorism is a complex phenomenon and it has deteriorating effects on the global economy. Since 2002, the world has witnessed a rise in all forms of terrorism. The economic disruptions caused by violent attacks and the fear of terrorism are massive. The global economic impact of terrorism amounted to USD33 billion in 2018 in constant PPP terms. Fear of terrorism influences economic behaviour and changes investment climate of the affected region (Global Terrorism Index, 2019). The direct costs of terrorism include deaths, injuries, GDP losses, property damage for the countries in conflicted zones. However, there are many indirect costs involved as well such as decline in tourism, financial markets, trade, foreign direct investment and entrepreneurship (Tingbani et al., 2018).

According to Global Terrorism Index 2019, South Asia, MENA and Sub-Saharan Africa are the most impacted regions which accounted for 93% of all deaths from terrorism. These regions also had most lethal attacks, averaging 1.95, 2.67 and 4.11 people killed per attack respectively.

Abdullah Ijaz
Source: GTD, IEP Calculations

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Political Economy and Economic Development: Conflict, FDI bonanza, Mobile Technology and False News

BY  CATERINA GENNAIOLI AND BEATRIZ RODRIGUEZ-SATIZABAL

On the 4th of December, 2019, the Centre for Globalisation Research (CGR) hosted their annual Workshop on Political Economy and Economic Development and the Globalisation Seminar. The event attracted QMUL staff, researchers from other UK universities and PhD students. Caterina Gennaioli (CGR Director, SBM), Pierre-Louis Vézina (King’s College), Carlo Schwarz (Warwick University) and Andrea Tesei (SEF QMUL), presented at the Workshop their most recent empirical work. The presentations covered a broad range of topics.

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Who benefits from using Derivatives?

By Praveen Gupta
What is CGR PhD's research about?
Introducing research projects of CGR PhD members

Financial Derivatives are instruments that were invented, at least in theory, to protect us from various risks arising in uncertain markets. In an ideal world, they were expected to work like this:

However, a combination of weak regulatory framework, individual greed and financial innovation gone rouge, resulted in 2008 financial crisis, which many blame on excessive and sometimes illegitimate use of Financial Derivatives.

Praveen03

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CGR Annual Globalisation Seminar and Workshop on Political Economy and Economic Development

On Wednesday, 4th of December the Centre for Globalisation Research (CGR) of the School of Business and Management, Queen Mary University of London is hosting the annual workshop on Political Economy and Economic Development and the Annual Globalisation Seminar.

This year the Annual Globalisation Seminar on the ‘The Political Effects of Internet and False News’ will be held by Professor Ekaterina Zhuravskaya.

Fake news facts

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